Teaching Medical Professionalism: Supporting The...

Item Information
Item#: 9781107495241
Edition 02
Author Cruess Et Al (Eds)
Cover Paperback
 


This book presents ideas, evidence and guidance for those interested in using the most recent advances in knowledge about learning and human development to enhance medical education's ability to form competent, caring and publicly responsible physicians. It does this by establishing the development of a professional identity in medical students and residents as a primary goal of medical education. This new approach is emerging from experience and experiment by medical educators articulating a new way of understanding their mission. It is an optimistic book - the voices are those of the leaders, theorists and experienced practitioners who have found in this new approach a promising way to confront the challenges of a new era in medicine. It summarizes the theoretical basis of identity formation, outlines our current knowledge of how best to assist learners as they acquire a professional identity, and addresses the issue of assessment of progress towards this goal.

Short Description
This book presents ideas and guidance about human development to enhance medical education's ability to form competent and responsible physicians.

Table of Contents
Introduction Richard L. Cruess, Sylvia R. Cruess and Yvonne Steinert; Part I. What Is to Be Taught and Learned: 1. Professionalism and professional identity formation: the cognitive base Richard L. Cruess and Sylvia R. Cruess; 2. Developing a professional identity - a learner's perspective Robert Sternszus; Part II. Theory: 3. Theoretical insights into the nature and nurture of professional identities Lynn V. Monrouxe; 4. Socialization, professionalism and professional identity formation Frederic William Hafferty; 5. Educational theory and strategies to support professionalism and professional identity formation Yvonne Steinert; 6. Role modelling and mentoring in the formation of professional identity Karen V. Mann and Elizabeth Gaufberg; 7. Experiential learning and reflection to support professionalism and professional identity formation Thomas A. Hutchinson and Mark Smilovitch; Part III. Principles: 8. General principles for establishing programs to support professionalism and professional identity formation at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels Sylvia R. Cruess and Richard L. Cruess; 9. Faculty development to support professionalism and professional identity formation Yvonne Steinert; 10. Becoming interprofessional: professional identity formation in the health professions Jill E. Thistlethwaite, Koshila Kumar and Christopher Roberts; 11. Assessment of professionalism and progress in the development of a professional identity John Norcini and Judy Shea; 12. Remediation of unprofessional behavior Louise Arnold, Christine Sullivan and Jennifer Quaintance; 13. Professional identity formation, the practicing physician and continuing professional development Jocelyn Locker, Ivan Silver and Janet de Groot; 14. Professionalism, professional identity, and licensing and accrediting bodies Donald Irvine; Part IV. Case Studies in Promoting Professionalism and Professional Identity Formation across the Continuum: 15. The evolution of an undergraduate medical program on professionalism and identity formation J. Donald Boudreau; 16. Developing and implementing an undergraduate curriculum based on professional identity formation Mark D. Holden, Era Buck and John Luk; 17. Supporting professionalism and professional identity formation at the postgraduate level Linda Snell; 18. Changing the educational environment to better support professionalism and professional identity formation Mark J. DiCorcia and Lee A. Learman; Part V. The Future: 19. Professional identities of the future: invisible and unconscious or deliberate and reflexive? Brian D. Hodges.